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20121201
20121231
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Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
that the economies matter. i think whether it's been leon panetta, bob gates, admiral mullen, the constant focus on economic feminism, i don't know canada's net position with china, but it does raise this fundamental question of whether american debt is an asset or a liability. you know, the conference in dallas yesterday were recently, where someone made a comment that an american source of power to every different in the past that it defies the pentagon and the size american debt that we're too big to fail. deadhorse lake bigger problem than us. i be interested when you're anything about policy do you look at that as a source of leverage or does it strain american options tremendous a? >> steve, very simply, the u.s. situation with respect to our deficit and debt is a national security liability. we need our senior leadership. we need a senior leadership to take it on. we have an opportunity to do so. we have a requirement to do so. at the foundation of national power is ultimately economic comment and in terms of global influence, in terms of the ability to support a military, the economic is
girlfriend and killed himself. nbc's bob costas used the tragedy as a springboard for an anti-gun lecture right in the middle of a football game. his remarks and the fierce debate are just ahead. hi. i'm henry winkler. and i'm here to tell homeowners that are 62 and older about a great way to live a better retirement. it's called a reverse mortgage. [ male announcer ] call right now to receive your free dvd and booklet with no obligation. it answers questions like how a reverse mortgage works, how much you qualify for, the ways to receive your money, and more. plus, when you call now, you'll get this magnifier with l.e.d. light absolutely free. when you call the experts at one reverse mortgage today, you'll learn the benefits of a government-insured reverse mortgage. it will eliminate your monthly mortgage payments and give you tax-free cash from the equity in your home. and here's the best part -- you still own your home. take control of your retirement today. ♪ ♪ >> simply stated, the american people don't want to close guantÁnamo bay, which is an isolated military controlled facil
's the chief of staff to governor bob macdonald. to denise northrop came from state of oklahoma where she is chief of staff to governor mary phalen and roxanne white is joining us from the great state of colorado where she's chief of staff to governor john hicken looper. and so their full bios are on the pamphlets and nare all very accomplished professionals in their careers. i'm going to ask roxanne to start and we can come down this way. >> great. first, thank you for the report. i think it provides a good framework for all of us as states to continue to look at the challenges facing us. we have been engaged in pension reform in colorado. our pension fund is about 69% solvent. we did major reform in the last administration. and we are now in court trying to defend that reform. our pension costs by 2020 will go to 22%. and so to give you a sense of how far behind we were as a state, if we lose in court and the battle is whether or not we as a state have a right to ratchet down the colas for our state employees, then we could see a need to go to 25% of compensation by 2020. so it's fairly
, bob costas uses a horrifying murder-suicide involving a nfl player to call for stricter gun control. appropriate use of his platform? our news watch panel weighs in. ♪ i wish my patits could see what i see. ♪ that over time, having high cholesterol and any of thesrisk factors can put them at increased risk for plaque buildup in their arteries. so it's even more important to lower their cholesterol, and that's why, when diet and exercise alone aren't enough, i prescribe crestor. in a clinical trial versus lipitor, crestor got more high-risk patients' bad cholesterol to a goal of under 100. [ female announcer ] crestor is not right for everyone. like people with liver disease or women who are nursing, pregnant or may become pregnant. tell your doctor about other medicines you're taking. call your doctor rht away if you have muscle pain or weakness, feel unusually tired, have loss of appetite, upper belly pain, dark urine or yellowing of skin or eyes. these could be signs of rare but serious sideeffects. ♪ is your cholesterol at goal? alk to your doctor aut crestor. [ female anno
is unaccountable, saturday night at 10:00 eastern on "after words" on c-span2. >>> pennsylvania senator bob casey on syria's civil war. he spoke along with incoming house foreign affairs committee chair ed royce on iran's nuclear program. the foundation for defense of democracies hosted this event. >> welcome. welcome again to the foundation for the defense of democracies annual washington forum. my name is mark argosh and i'm a proud supporter of fdd. it brings me great pleasure to introduce another senior official doing great work on capitol hill. congressman ed royce currently chairs the subcommittee on terrorism, nonproliferation and trade. last week he was selected to be the next chairman of the house foreign affairs committee. congratulations, congressman, on this new and important role. [applause] >> thanks, mark, thank you very much. >> it's no surprise that congressman royce has been entrusted by his colleagues with the committee's gavel have. he stands consistently at the forefront at the fight against global terrorist groups that threaten the united states including al qaeda. in his un
is 88 years old. he has been in the hospital since the day after thanksgiving. former senator bob dole made a rare visit to capitol hill today. appearing frail to observers after recent hospital stay. he is 89 now. he was in d.c. to rally treaty for disability rights. his service in world war ii left his right arm permanently disabled but the former g.o.p. leader could not convince his fellow republicans to accept the treaty. they claim it would give the u.n. too much influence on u.s. policy. the measure failed five votes shy of the needed two thirds majority. the head of fema says the agency will not run out of money for victims of super storm sandy until next spring. he says so far the feds have given out about $2 billion. and he claims there is almost 5 billion left in the disaster fund. but officials in new york and new jersey plus connecticut have asked for more than $80 billion. lawmakers in states hit hard by the storm are calling for an emergency spending bill but some republicans are demanding spending cuts to offset the extra disaster relief. and toys are on the way for many
] >> bob samuels -- this working? bob samuels from "the washington post." this is for admiral mullen. i think the proposals of the administration are to reduce the marine corps by 20,000 and the army by 80,000 from their peaks, and there is much speculation that further cuts in the pentagon budget would lead to additional cuts in the both the army and the marines. if the united states was put in the position where it had to occupy and protect the oil fields of the persian gulf for an extended period of time, say five, six years, are those forces adequate to do the job? >> one of the, one of the reasons i at least was able to get through the tour as chairman is try not to speculate too much on hypotheticals. the reductions in both the army and the marine corps have been in the budget now -- i think they're in the '13 budget, so basically they've been on the hill, the beginnings of them, they've been on the hill for the better part of a year, and they are reductions both the chiefs of those two services and the chairman all support. clearly -- and i did as well when i was chairman over a
to the event with remarks from incoming chairman ed royce and senator bob casey and talking about syria and tensions in iran coming up in a few minutes. we will bring you a portion of the morning portion of the discussion at the foundation for defense of democracy. this segment and this panel discussion focused on the egyptian elections. >> good morning everyone. thank you, bob, for that introduction and thank you all of you for coming out early this morning for what i think will be a lively debate. we are going to be asking the question if democracy is to triumph in the middle east, victories at the ballot box are inavoidable and essential. this is the motion we will be debating in the intelligence-squared format per requests from our panelists who have done this once already -- they have had a practice round. they have not had a chance of doing this, but i suspect, had probably had several scotches and talked about ways to defeat their foes. we know that this is a time of revolution in the middle east. it started with a fruit sell seller in tunisia and toppled a 230-year dictator that
in 2011. according to a recorded conversation obtained by washington post reporter and author bob woodward. >> i'm not running. >> reporter: making the pitch is katie mcfarland. she tells the general that ailes was willing to give up his job at the network to run a pate pa try use campaign. >> reporter: that big boss, she says, was rupert murdoch, head of fox news parent company news corp ration. but petraeus repeatedly shoots down the idea. after he later accepted the job at the cia, mcfarland went on fox to talk about her conversation with the general, but never mentioned the ailes' offer. >> i think that he doesn't want to run. i asked him that question and he said i'm not running for president. >> reporter: ailes said he did ask mcfarland to approach petraeus, but added -- >> cnn media critic howard kirk says one part of the pitch is because in. >> the idea that rupert murdoch would bankroll it is not that far-fetched. >> reporter: murdoch repeatedly injected himself in the race, saying mitt romney last week, tough chicago pros will be hard to beat unless he drops old friends from team
senator bob kerry and a former staffer for pennsylvania governor ed rendell. ron is a former communications director to the house speaker, dennis hastert. good to see you both. >> good to sigh. >> gregg: donna, let's start with what the president was offering a. even democrats are criticizing him for demanding 150 billion in more spending. not less, including a $50 billion stimulus this next year. at a time when the focus perhaps should be on spending cuts, are those democrats right? >> well, i'm hearing many more democrats resonating with the message that the president is delivering and that message is that he ran on and got elected on the basis of more taxes for the most wealthy americans. i think that there is a real danger for republicans in not really hearing that message. i've been impressed by the number of republicans that have made positive indications that more revenue could be forth coming, even in the form of tax increases on the most wealthy americans. and i think that there is a little bit of danger i think for the republican party as they redefine themselves as
. >>> dramatic confrontation on capitol hill. bob dole appeared in the senate floor in a wheelchair to urge passage of an international treaty promoting rights for disabled people around the world. the republicans blocked it yesterday. one of the most vocal supporters is senator john kerry of massachuset massachusetts, the chairman of the foreign relations committee. senator, thanks very much for coming in. >> good to be here. >> you needed 67 votes to ratify this treaty. you got 61 votes. there were some republicans who went ahead and voted in favor, a lot of them didn't, and in part, this is at least what some of their staff told me, it's because the former senator rick santorum, the former republican presidential candidate raised this issue i is aing this international treaty would undermine his ability to deal with his daughter, for example, isabella, who's disabled. listen to what santorum said. >> i don't often bring isabella out for any types of public events. karen and i felt very strongly that as a mother and father of a disabled child, that we needed to speak for those in the disa
morning. >> host: good morning, bob. >> caller: question. this is a topic that nobody wants to talk about. the interest-rate cut the interest that is paid on the national debt. presently most of our debt is under short term, under 1%. and it's manipulated, of course, by the federal reserve and treasury department. so it's going to go from say 250 billion interest payments up to 7%, the next several years. one half trillion dollars in interest annually on the national debt. wondering, how is that going to impact our military industrial complex in the near future when that actually comes to be? >> that clearly -- the ticking time bomb for any part of the federal government and probably because of. [indiscernible] , the state government. we are in a time of unusually low interest rates. it will continue for a time, but when they rise it is going to be a body blow to the national politics and the country because, as your caller was indicating, the jump from 1% to 7% is such a massive increase in taxes that the only thing i can think of is, can you say greece? >> host: what does it mean for th
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)